[newer] eflyer – Journal of Urban Cultural Studies (Intellect)

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Introducing Urban Cultural Studies Podcasts!

UCS_Podcasts_Image_758kb

Introducing Urban Cultural Studies Podcasts!

There’s a new page on this site (main menu bar above) dedicated to the podcasts, which will feature interviews with authors of recent article-length publications relating to the cultures of cities. Episodes will be in the 20-minute range and strive to venture beyond the content of the original publication. Still some tech stuff to figure out, but they will eventually be available both here and through iTunes.

Answer Key to Bergson and Lefebvre Mash-Up (pts 1-3)

Here are the original sources for the sentences in the Bergson-Lefebvre Mash-up–the complete text follows:

[REFERENCES] L1939 = Lefebvre, Dialectical Materialism; L1991 = Lefebvre, The Production of Space; L1992 = Lefebvre, Rhythmanalysis; L1995 = Lefebvre, Introduction to Modernity; B1896 = Bergson, Matter and Memory; B1907 = Bergson, Creative Evolution; B2002 = Bergson, The Creative Mind

That the lived, conceived and perceived realms should be interconnected, so that the ‘subject’, the individual member of a given social group, may move from one another without confusion – so much is a logical necessity. Whether they constitute a coherent whole is another matter (L1991:40). These planes, moreover, are not given as ready-made things superimposed the one on the other. Rather they exist virtually, with that existence which is proper to things of the spirit. The intellect, forever moving in the interval which separates them, unceasingly finds them again, or creates them anew: the life of intellect consists in this very movement (B1896:322): Look around you at this meadow, this garden, these trees and these houses. Continue reading

Link

Dr. Reena Tiwari published a book called Space-Body-Ritual: Performativity in the City in which she puts a reading of Henri Lefebvre’s Rhythmanalysis to use in arguing for approaching the ‘city-as-body’, rather than ‘city-as-text’. It’s in my stack of current ‘to-reads’, and may be of interest to readers here.

Looking for information about the author, I came upon this Q&A, in which she touches on issues relating to urban architecture, public housing, poverty and migration. She makes some interesting points about making spaces that are ‘mixed’, both socioeconomically and public/private. Tiwari is both a scholar and an urban planner; is anyone here familiar with her book, or her work in general?

Note too that the website (www.cluster.eu) hosting this conversation may well be worth exploring, especially to readers interested in urban thought in Italy.