Call for abstracts: On_Culture: The Open Journal for the Study of Culture

Call for Abstracts for Issue 10 (Winter 2020)

Metaphors of Migration

Guest editors: Jörn Ahrens, Axel Fliethmann

This guest-edited issue of On_Culture focuses on migration, one of the most pressing issues that contemporary societies currently face. The lived reality of migration is fundamentally framed by discourse formations, where metaphors can function as creative devices to establish a reality of what migration could or even should mean. Seen from this perspective migration and imagination are closely tied as two subjects of central interest and core concern in both the Humanities and the Social Sciences.

Although at a first gaze both topics seem to be quite unconnected, “migration” playing a central part of current research in the Social Sciences, “imagination” being traditionally discussed in the humanities and arts, obviously both fields are strongly related to each other. Both, the social perception and the political discourse about migration, but also its very practice from refugees to modern nomads, refers to and stems from particular forms and techniques of imagination through which migration is approached and labeled as social reality. The “ways of worldmaking” (N. Goodman) as much as “society as an imaginary institution” (C. Castoriadis) speak to what has become the social reality of migration on a global scale. We will not be able to understand the processes and phenomena of migration accurately without acknowledging that, although it is a real problem, which often yields tragic consequences, migration is nurtured by tropes of imagination. More than other subjects today, migration seems to fill a gap in the production of cultural meaning and socio-political imagination. Thus the phenomenon of migration should accordingly be analyzed as depending on social practices and imaginations, which eventually equip the political discourse with cultural meaning and provoke demands for particular forms of management. 

The cultural perception of processes of migration is massively communicated by the use of metaphors by which migration as a distinct phenomenon is embedded into a particular frame of cultural codes and meaning. The cultural poetics of metaphors as social practice help to identify migration as something which is distinct part of an as normative as coherent Weltbild. At the same time, the social perception and construction of a social reality of migration massively refer to practices of cultural imagination. Migration as a phenomenon clearly connects to a long standing history of cultural memorization that is, in large parts, laden with imaginative topoi. That way, migration as cultural imago refers to figures in mythology, prose, ideology, etc. The reality of migration within society is only emerging within the frames of performative cultural practices of imagination in various ways.

Migrating plants, animals, and people are subject of massive restrictions and, if successful by migration, often object of campaigns and activism with the aim to reverse this process. Also, we can observe the migration of ideas, images, or art—all of which unfolding massive influence on possible transformations of a seemingly given social and cultural reality. Capital is as much migrating—legally as illegally—as objects ranging from food to weaponry with often enormous consequences for their destination societies. Eventually, abstract threats to the life of humans and others are constantly migrating—bacteria, virus, disease, radio activity, etc. In the digital realm, migration seems to be an illusion when any website only seems to be one click away.

If migration is pointing to social practices of imagination as genuine social practices, migration cannot separate notions of disturbance and disruption, practices of othering, and exclusion, or assimilation from forms of signification and any crisis of ‘making sense’. Adequate understanding of migration therefore warrants interdisciplinary collaboration within the Humanities and the Social Sciences. Competences from philology and literature studies, art history, philosophy, media studies, etc., must be taken into account alongside with the expertise from sociology, political science, anthropology, criminology, and psychology. 

If you are interested in having a peer reviewed academic article featured in this issue of On_Culture, please submit an abstract of 300 words with the article title, 5-6 keywords, and a short biographical note to content@on-culture.org (subject line “Abstract Submission Issue 10”) no later than February 28, 2020. You will be notified by March 15, 2020 whether your paper proposal has been accepted. The final date for full paper submissions is June 15, 2020.

Please note: On_Culture also features a section devoted to shorter, creative pieces pertaining to each issue topic. These can be interviews, essays, opinion pieces, reviews of exhibitions, analyses of cultural artifacts and events, photo galleries, videos, works of art … and more! These contributions are uploaded on a rolling basis, also to previous issues. Interested in contributing? Send your ideas to the Editorial Team at any time: content@on-culture.org

About On_Culture: The Open Journal for the Study of Culture 

On_Culture: The Open Journal for the Study of Culture (ISSN: 2366-4142) is a biannual, peer-reviewed academic e-journal edited by doctoral researchers, postdocs, and professors working at the International Graduate Centre for the Study of Culture (GCSC) at Justus-Liebig-University Giessen. It provides a forum reflecting on the study of culture. It investigates, problematizes, and develops key concepts and methods in the field by means of a collaborative and collective process. On_Culture is dedicated to fostering such engagements as well as the cultural dynamics at work in thinking about and reflecting on culture.

The journal consists of three sections: peer-reviewed academic _Articles, _Essays, and the aforementioned _Perspectives. On_Culture brings new approaches and emerging topics to the (trans)national study of culture ‘on the line’ and, in so doing, fills the gap ____ between ‘on’ and ‘culture.’ There are numerous ways of filling the gap, and a plurality of approaches is something for which the journal strives with each new issue.Please note: as a commitment to the open access to scholarship, On_Culture does not charge any Article Processing Charges (APCs) for the publication of your contribution!

Visit the website for more information: www.on-culture.org


Call for Papers – Journal of Urban Cultural Studies

Puerta del Sol, Madrid, Spain. Photo by Juan Laurent (taken around 1870)

The Journal of Urban Cultural Studies (JUCS) is pleased to announce its permanent call for papers for authors working on cultural productions and urban studies. JUCS is a peer-refereed, international journal that blends humanities and social science approaches to the culture(s) of cities. The journal is open to studies that deal with culture, urban spaces, and forms of urbanized consciousness from all over the world.

JUCS is particularly interested in submissions that give equal weight to: a) one or more aspects of urban studies, and b) the analysis of one or more specific forms of cultural/textual production in relation to a given urban space or spaces. JUCS publishes both research articles and short-form articles. Research articles (7,000 to 10,000 words, including references and notes) are the hallmark of the journal and represent an original contribution to the field. JUCS also publishes short-form articles of 2,500–4,000 words.

Short-form articles can take many forms: interviews, analyses of art installations, review essays (pitched globally and discussing at least three book titles) or discussions of theoretical debates and interdisciplinary issues relating to urban cultural studies. Please notice that the journal does not publish ‘book reviews.’ JUCS is also interested in receiving proposals for special issues by guest editors working individually or in teams of two, and original, unpublished artwork on the topic of cities. Journal contributors will receive a free PDF copy of their final work upon publication. Print copies of the journal may also be purchased by contributors at half price.

Revision and submission

Research articles are subject to peer review, while short-form articles are subject to editorial review. All articles submitted should be original work and must not be under consideration by other publications. To learn more, please refer to our journal website:

https://www.intellectbooks.com/journal-of-urban-cultural-studies

Submissions should be sent by email to:

jucssubmissions@gmail.com<mailto:jucssubmissions@gmail.com>;

Any other correspondence with the editor should be sent to:

 urbanculturalstudies@gmail.com

This blog, https://urbanculturalstudies.wordpress.com is another way to keep up with the Urban Cultural Studies community, find out about upcoming events, new books, and publishing opportunities, and listen to our series of Urban Cultural Studies Podcasts.

Call for Abstracts – Association of American Geographers Conference (AAG, 2020)

Photo by Sebastian Pichler on Unsplash

The Journal of Urban Cultural Studies invites submission of abstracts to be included in the interactive short paper session -described below- at the Association of American Geographers Conference on April 3-7, 2020 in Denver, Colorado.

The Urban Cultural Studies session features innovative research that connects urban geography and cultural studies to improve our understanding of urban culture(s). The submissions will explore aspects of urban studies and its relationship with textual forms of culture such as literature, film, graphic novels, music, graffiti, videogames, etc. This session is linked to the Journal of Urban Cultural Studies (Intellect Books) and its accompanying blog and podcast series at urbanculturalstudies.wordpress.com.

Following the model of a ‘lightning round session,’ each of the 10-14 panelists in the Urban Cultural Studies session will present a 5-minute summary of research or studies in process. A 30 to 45-minute interactive roundtable discussion will follow the presentations. In order to submit an abstract, register for the conference here:

http://www.aag.org/cs/annualmeeting/register

Once registered,  proceed to the abstract and session submission console. Select the “New Abstract” button on the console page and follow the on-screen instructions to submit the appropriate abstract type. You will receive an email confirmation after your submission. Format guidelines for AAG can be found in our call for papers at:

http://www.aag.org/cs/annualmeeting/call_for_papers

After submitting your abstract, please contact Dr. Araceli Masterson-Algar with your assigned PIN number via email at aracelimasterson [at] gmail [dot] com

The abstract submission deadline is October 30, 2019. Feel free to contact Dr. Masterson-Algar at any time should you have additional questions. 

CFP–new Journal of Urban Cultural Studies launched

Visit the new Journal of Urban Cultural Studies site here.

Call for Papers

The Journal of Urban Cultural Studies is a new peer-reviewed publication cutting across both the humanities and the social sciences in order to better understand the culture(s) of cities. The journal is open to studies that deal with culture, urban spaces and forms of urbanized consciousness the world over.

Although we embrace a broad definition of urban cultural studies, we are particularly interested in submissions that give equal weight to: a) one or more aspects of urban studies (everyday life, built environment, architecture, city planning, identity formation, transportation…) and b) analysis of one or more specific forms of cultural/textual production (literature, film, graphic novels, music, art, graffiti, videogames, online or virtual space…) in relation to a given urban space or spaces.

Essays of 7,000-10,000 words (including works cited and notes) should be sent by attachment to the Editor at urbanculturalstudies@gmail.com. JUCS is also open to proposals of special issues by guest editors working individually or in teams of two. All citations in other languages should be translated into English for the journal’s international reading public, in addition to including the original text.

While the journal does not publish book reviews, we do publish review essays—which should discuss 3-5 recent books on a shared topic or theme (or place) and run from 2,500 to 4,000 words. Review essays of urban-themed installations or other works of art are also welcome. These essays will be reviewed in house. Given our visual focus, we are interested in original, unpublished artwork on the topic of cities and in publishing articles accompanied by images where appropriate.

We encourage a variety of approaches to the urban phenomenon—the strengths of the editorial board run from urban geography to literature and film, photography and videogames, gender and sexuality, creative economy, popular music, Marxist approaches, fashion, urban planning, anthropology, sociology, Deaf culture, built environment, philosophy, architecture, detective fiction and noir, and more…