Hans van der Meer’s not so empty realms

Xenotopia

Cardiff gallery ‘Other Spaces’(a name I thoroughly approve of, for soundly xenotopic reasons) are currently hosting an exhibition of Dutch photographer Hans van der Meer.  The show is called ‘Off the Shelf’ and consists of  images of strange suburban spaces that are both utterly banal and strangely distinctive.  At first sight they could be anywhere, but the closer you look you realise that they are very particular indeed – distinctively Dutch, as van der Meer himself claims.  I was asked to write an essay to accompany the exhibition which you can read here:  other spaces writing 1-2 Van Der Meer Angus Cameron.

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Vertical horizons of Hong Kong by romain jacquet-lagreze

urbanus vulgaris

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“‘vertical horizon’, by french graphic artist romain jacquet-lagreze is a photographic journey between the buildings of the relentlessly
growing metropolis of hong-kong. the image series takes a deep dive into the city’s thick atmospheres, showcasing a visual record of
its wildly diverse built environment. presented in a hard-cover book, the collection of unique compositions contemplate the raw
nature of chinese culture and the expression of its sheer vivacity.” – Designboom.com

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Taken from: http://www.designboom.com/art/vertical-horizons-by-romain-jacquet-lagreze/

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Images from Madrid 14-N

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Here’s a feeble attempt to post something after so much time away from blog, life, teaching, and so on–a few images shot from the streets of Madrid on November 14 during the “huelga, huelga, huelga general” [general strike] or to use another chant “Las huelgas no se venden, las huelgas se defienden” [strikes aren’t for sale, strikes are for defending–[better translation out there?]. I wasn’t present for some of the infrequent skirmishes of the day, but a highlight was the manifestation of 6:30 in the afternoon which, as with other protests of the day, drew from a wide cross-section of Madrileñans, both younger and older who gathered in central Madrid from Cibeles up to Plaza Colón and back down to the statue of Neptune by the Prado and of course on the Gran Vía and elsewhere. Television coverage was on the whole slanted toward the PP / Rajoy of course, which might be expected.

More on the T2M conference which I was attending there [in the Museo del Ferrocarril at Delicias] later…

CFP-edited book on Marxism and Urban Culture

CFP-edited book on Marxism and Urban Culture

Submissions are invited for an edited book on Marxism and Urban Culture that has received initial interest from an international publisher known for their strength in Marxian-themed series and titles.

While all abstracts using a Marxian framework to approach culture in urban contexts are welcome, it is anticipated that submissions will conform to one of two subtypes reflecting the division of the book into Continue reading

CFP–new Journal of Urban Cultural Studies launched

Visit the new Journal of Urban Cultural Studies site here.

Call for Papers

The Journal of Urban Cultural Studies is a new peer-reviewed publication cutting across both the humanities and the social sciences in order to better understand the culture(s) of cities. The journal is open to studies that deal with culture, urban spaces and forms of urbanized consciousness the world over.

Although we embrace a broad definition of urban cultural studies, we are particularly interested in submissions that give equal weight to: a) one or more aspects of urban studies (everyday life, built environment, architecture, city planning, identity formation, transportation…) and b) analysis of one or more specific forms of cultural/textual production (literature, film, graphic novels, music, art, graffiti, videogames, online or virtual space…) in relation to a given urban space or spaces.

Essays of 7,000-10,000 words (including works cited and notes) should be sent by attachment to the Editor at urbanculturalstudies@gmail.com. JUCS is also open to proposals of special issues by guest editors working individually or in teams of two. All citations in other languages should be translated into English for the journal’s international reading public, in addition to including the original text.

While the journal does not publish book reviews, we do publish review essays—which should discuss 3-5 recent books on a shared topic or theme (or place) and run from 2,500 to 4,000 words. Review essays of urban-themed installations or other works of art are also welcome. These essays will be reviewed in house. Given our visual focus, we are interested in original, unpublished artwork on the topic of cities and in publishing articles accompanied by images where appropriate.

We encourage a variety of approaches to the urban phenomenon—the strengths of the editorial board run from urban geography to literature and film, photography and videogames, gender and sexuality, creative economy, popular music, Marxist approaches, fashion, urban planning, anthropology, sociology, Deaf culture, built environment, philosophy, architecture, detective fiction and noir, and more…

Michael Wolf photos of Hong Kong / Architecture of Human Density

Here are some fascinating images of Hong Kong’s density by Michael Wolf. They appear in their original context here, and he has a (costly) book on the subject as well…

Images, essays related to Madrid’s inclined towers

For those who read the earlier post on the Torres KIO in Madrid with interest, here is a book just out featuring one half of the towers on the cover.

The great thing is the photo itself, which was taken by photographer Miguel Sandoval Díaz, an incredible shot–the extended exposure time allows for shadowy, mobile traffic at the bottom right (although that is slightly covered up in the layout). If interested in his photography (I believe he is based in Madrid), he has volunteered his email (msandoval1985@gmail.com) as contact information.

For hispanist scholars, there are three essays in the book (Nathan Richardson, Susan Divine and Thomas Deveny) that deal with the films of director Alex de la Iglesia–the towers, aka the Puerta de Europa appear in his cult classic The Day of the Beast (1995)–and a few more that deal with geography/urban space in literature and film (by Edward Baker, Susan Larson, Agustín Cuadrado, Araceli Masterson, Shalisa Collins…).