Cities and Citizens 17th-Century Studies Conference (13-15 July 2015)

Cities and Citizens 17th-Century Studies Conference

13th July 2015, 09:00 to 15th July 2015, 14:00, Durham University

DOWNLOAD THE CALL FOR PAPERS HERE – deadline 15 January 2015.

Conference website: https://www.dur.ac.uk/imems/events/?eventno=20694

 Confirmed keynote speakers :

Professor Chris Fitter (Rutgers University) Title to be confirmed

Professor Susanne Rau (University of Erfurt) From Urbanization to Urbanity. New trends in exploring the history of early modern cities

Professor Phil Withington (University of Sheffield) Early Modern English Urbanization Reconsidered

The 2015 conference focuses on the topic of ‘Cities and Citizens’ and will focus on the ways in which urban centres were perceived, experienced, understood and represented in the ‘long seventeenth century’ (c.1580-1720). The conference will be held within the World Heritage Site on Palace Green in the heart of the seventeenth-century bishopric capital of Durham.

The conference aims to provide an opportunity for scholars in a range of disciplines to meet and discuss their work on the city and citizenship. Our over-arching theme is the distinctive urban experience of the seventeenth century. How did the seventeenth-century European city arise from late medieval urbanism and become established in the New World? How did the European city stand between the Renaissance and the Enlightenment? How did cities and ‘citizenship’ function in non-European cultures? How did different urban cultures interact and influence one another?

We invite papers on how the built environment of the city was represented in cartography, painting, printed images and in literary and dramatic works. What were the physical and sensory characteristics of the urban environment? How did the material form of the city change? Especially important here is architectural form – civic, ecclesiastical, official and vernacular. How did urban and rural people read the urban landscape? Here we hope to draw on the insights of archaeological theory as well as on Continue reading

CFP – Media City 5 International Conference and Exhibition

CALL FOR PAPERS

MEDIA CITY 5 International Conference and Exhibition
1st ­ 3rd May 2015
Plymouth University, UK
http://mediacity.i-dat.org<http://mediacity.i-dat.org/home/>

The theme of the fifth MEDIACITY conference is reflecting on social smart
cities.

Much of our thinking around technology and the city is based around
polarising paradigms. On one hand we have the smart city agenda that is
underpinned by a vision of data-centred optimisation of urban systems and
on the other hand we have a open-source, citizen driven approach based
around ad-hoc practices and prototyping of counter-culture scenarios.
These paradigms of city visions are described variously through terms such
as “digital city, screen city, media city, sentient city, u-city, fusion
city, hybrid city, intelligent city, connectiCity, pervasive city and the
smart city” and we seek to look beyond the rhetoric and critically reflect
and imagine new models and approaches to media and the city. We want to
challenge over-simplified assumptions around terms such as smart city, and
understand in more detail the complex interactions between social actors
and technological transformations of the city. The aim of the conference
is to consider more fully the multiple, subtle, and interdependent
spatio-temporalities which together work to constitute ICT-based urban
change. In particular we will discuss models of participation, action and
agency, shifting capacity to act beyond the ‘like’ button and to take
responsibility for the future shape of the city.
The conference addresses the approaches and the corresponding design
responses that meet the challenges of social, citizen-centred, smart
cities and communities. It will offer reflective, high quality theoretical
and design-based responses to the question of how media and ICTs can
create alternative responses to current societal challenges.

Topics
We will look at urbanity and digital media and ideas of place and space
and reflect on new models, landscapes and frameworks in the social smart
city. We explore how ‘the city’ as a site of participation is enabled
through media and technology and modes of citizen participation and agency
as well as how temporal installations and urban prototyping enable us to
imagine other possible futures. We will also look to the Internet of
Things to explore the way in which objects increasingly become sentient
actors in urban life. Through this we will address broader issues of
resilience and sustainability and how these intertwine with media and
technological frameworks. We provisionally propose three main sub-themes:

Place
Urban Design, public place-making, network infrastructures and resilience
People
social participation, urban prototyping, big data and agency
Things
The Internet of Things (IoT), sentience, social memory and networked
objects.

The conference audience will be drawn from an interdisciplinary field of
architecture, geography, human computer interaction, planning, media
studies, art and sociology to gather and exchange multiple perspectives on
common challenges.

CONTRIBUTIONS
Submissions to be uploaded to the conference’s EasyChair website:
https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=mc5

Paper abstracts
Paper submissions are a two-stage process. Authors are asked Continue reading

AAG 2015: CFP Urban Cultural Studies

Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting, Chicago, 21–25 April 2015

Urban Cultural Studies: Call for Papers

Convenor:

Stephen Vilaseca (Northern Illinois University)

The Urban Cultural Studies interactive session features innovative research that connects urban geography and cultural studies in order to better understand the culture(s) of cities.

The interactive short papers will explore aspects of urban studies, possibly in connection to humanities texts such as literature, film, graphic novels, music, art, graffiti, videogames and other textual forms of culture or otherwise through social science perspectives on spatial practices, broadly considered.

Each of the 10-14 panelists in the Urban Cultural Studies session will present a 5-minute summary of research or studies in process.

A 30- to 45-minute interactive roundtable discussion will follow the presentations. This session is linked to the Journal of Urban Cultural Studies with Intellect publishers http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Journal,id=225/ and its accompanying blog and podcast series at urbanculturalstudies.wordpress.com.

Please contact Stephen Vilaseca with questions.

Madrid’s Gran Vía Digital Humanities Project

Brief video introduction [created with Camtasia 2] explaining a student-produced Digital Humanities project investigating Madrid’s Gran Vía [created with Omeka / Neatline].

This way of approaching DH work is particularly conducive to urban-scaled projects, and does not require extensive data mining or GIS components – although these approaches could certainly be integrated. (I will be presenting this project alongside my colleague at a June conference in Charleston titled: Data Driven: Digital Humanities in the Library.)

Explore the map-interface of the actual DH project here.

States of Mind and the City: Place and Wellbeing Symposium Oct. 2014 Istanbul

States of Mind and the City: Place and Wellbeing Symposium

15-17 October 2014, Istanbul

 

Scope

The “States of Mind and the City: Place and Wellbeing”  Symposium is intended as a multidisciplinary platform to bring together perspectives on the meanings, challenges, and potential in geographically interpreting wellbeing in urban settings. The event will explore the city as a geopolitical site of emotional wellbeing and mental health by drawing on Istanbul’s past, present, formal, confined, improvised, informal, fictional and lived therapeutic landscapes. Some examples of these places include hospitals, mental institutions, parks, green/grey lots, trails, seafronts, gardens, coffeehouses, neighbourhood markets, spice and herb shops, barbershops, springs, spas and public baths, art venues, cemeteries, mosques, churches and other holy places. Some other examples might be assessments of walkability, soundscapes or the city skyline. In these examples the site-specific aspect is less fixed, more dynamic, and the healing aspect might be related to visceral experiences of movement, rhythm and angle/vista.

Place and Wellbeing

Place is crucial to how we think, feel, act and relate to others. The Symposium is a platform to explore wellbeing as a performative continuum of embodied action and place-based experience. In its 2005 definition the World Health Organization refers to mental health as “a state of wellbeing in which the individual realizes his or her own abilities, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and Continue reading

CfP: Metropolitan Streets: Everyday Temporalities and Contemporaneity

[from URB-GEOG-GORUM] Submissions are invited for the panel “Metropolitan Streets: Everyday Temporalities and Contemporaneity”, as part of the forthcoming conference “Metropolitan Temporalities”, November 20 – 22, 2014 at the Technische Universität in Berlin, Germany.

Over the past three decades, both urban studies and globalization studies have predominately focused on spatial concerns, often neglecting the important temporal dimensions of global urban development. Our third annual conference therefore seeks to systematically examine the diverse temporal aspects of global exchange and metropolitan development in four thematic clusters: metropolitan pasts and futures; politics of time; metropolitan rhythms; and economies of time.

Session Description:

Historically, streets and their social and spatial orders have changed over time according to the respective societal setting. Streets have always been the most profound units of urban life and the main elements to structure urban form and transportation. However, with the rise of the profession of urban planning, streets have been increasingly reshaped, according to the planner’s ideals of their time.

Today, streets with their specific spatial and social orders are the most dynamic space-time settings in a metropolis: they comprise a high degree of mobility, varying uses, agents, everyday practices and activities, norms, values, symbolic meanings, and power relations as well as a constant negotiation in between them. All of these coexist and Continue reading

Seeing Like A City: A Symposium (QMU of London, June 6-7, 2014)

SEEING LIKE A CITY

A Symposium

Queen Mary University of London

Keynote Address: Professor Mariana Valverde (University of Toronto) and Michael McKinnie (Queen Mary University of London)*

Keynote: Friday 6th June 6pm (open to the public)

Symposium: Saturday 7th June (all day)

 Deadline for abstracts: Monday 7th April

How have infrastructures of performance shaped civic ideas and ideals in mundane and spectacular ways? How are these ideas and ideals contained, contaminated, revealed and concealed spatially, temporally, legally and historically through cultural activity? How does cultural activity shape and see the city?

Seeing Like a City is an interdisciplinary symposium centred on the relationships between theatre, performance and urbanism.  In the past, theatre and performance scholars including Marvin Carlson, Jen Harvie, D.J. Hopkins, Ric Knowles, Kim Solga, have seen the city as a fertile site for considering a range of urban performances. Seeing Like a City builds on this work; it invites researchers to take up the challenge of accounting for contemporary urban performance.

This event is inspired by Mariana Valverde’s article ‘Seeing Like a City’ (2009), which offers a reading of the urban that acknowledges Continue reading