Amin and Thrift’s Seeing Like a City reviewed at Society and Space

PHILOSOPHY IN A TIME OF ERROR

By Michele Lancione here. She writes:

Amin and Thrift’s contribution is an important one because it pushes urban scholars out of their comfort zones, even more so than their 2002 Cities did. Seeing Like a City invites the reader to tackle fundamental urban questions—of epistemology, economy, and marginality—from a radically new perspective: one attentive to the (un)makings of infrastructural life and its immanent potential. The book is not easily digested nor comfortable, but that is a small price to pay for a contribution that offers a rare opportunity to reimagine what urban studies and politics can and should be.

Source: SEEING LIKE A CITY BY ASH AMIN AND NIGEL THRIFT – Society & Space

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CFP Surveillance, Architecture and Control – Edited Collection

Call for papers; Surveillance, Architecture and Control

Call for Papers: Edited Collection
Surveillance, Architecture and Control: Discourses on Spatial Culture

As our current political and cultural climate elucidates, the modern world has become increasingly fascinated by surveillance systems. Popular television series’ such as Westworld and The Handmaid’s Tale speak of our fears of being controlled by those watching us, whilst remastered movies such as
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CFP – TICYUrb June 2018

Call for Papers and Posters:

The TICYUrb (Third International Conference of Young Urban Researchers) is an international event that aims to echo frontier research, artistic works and professional practice related to different urban contexts around the world, under an environment of vibrant dialog between academia and society.
The conference is split in ten tracks: Collectivecity (the right to the city: 50 years later), Productcity (the city as a product), Divercity (diversity in the city), Fractalcity (the city amid policies), Ucity (utopias and dystopias), Fearcity (in-security), Metacity (ways of thinking and making city), Transitcity (migrations and racism), RiskCity (risks in the city) and City O’clock (24 hours in the city). We encourage the submission of theoretical and empirical works about these topics. TICYUrb wish to act as a bridge between social, human, natural and all other scientific domains, so every paper will be welcomed and accepted for consideration.
We encourage the submission of theoretical or empirical works about these topics. TICYUrb wish to act as a bridge between social, human, natural and all other scientific domains, so every paper will be welcomed and accepted for consideration.

Abstract of max. 500 words and a short biography/Vita via must be submitted via the form in our web-site.

We accept papers in English, Portuguese, Spanish, and French.

Authors should let us know in which language they prefer to present their papers.

This event will be a platform for sharing ongoing or recent work, open debate and networking. In parallel with the conference sessions, there will be open debates among young professional, exclusive networking sessions, and field excursions, among other activities.
TICYUrb will be held in Lisbon from June 18th to June 22nd 2018 at ISCTE-IUL
TICYURB is a collaborative effort of the Centre for Research and Studies in Sociology (CIES-IUL), the Research Center on Socioeconomic Change and Territory (DINAMIA’CET-IUL), the Interdisciplinar Center of Social Sciences (CICS.NOVA), the Institute of Sociology – University of Porto (ISUP) and the School of Architecture of the University of Sheffield (SSoA).
For further information visit our website: ticyurb.wordpress.com
And follow us in Twitter @ticyurb and Facebook: facebook.com/TICYURB

Manuel Garcia-Ruiz
Research Assistant at CIES-IUL & ISUP
TICYUrb Coordinator

JUCS 4.1-2 double issue now published!

Volume 4 Issue 1-2
Cover Date: July 2017

Contents
SPECIAL SECTION: CITIES IN THE LUSO-HISPANIC WORLD
Edited by Araceli Masterson-Algar and Stephen Luis Vilaseca
Through the Looking Glass: Windows to ‘Cities in the Luso-Hispanic World’
Authors: Araceli Masterson-Algar And Stephen Luis Vilaseca
Page Start: 3
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Pharmakopolis: Cesário Verde’s Lisbon
Authors: Charles Rice-Davis
Page Start: 13
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Rehoused but unhomed: The effects of Portugal’s Special Rehousing Program as represented in Pedro Costa’s Juventude em Marcha
Authors: Emily Knudson-Vilaseca
Page Start: 31
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‘La Callejera’: Streetwalks through Minas Gerais in Autran Dourado’s Uma vida em segredo (1964)
Authors: Araceli Masterson-Algar
Page Start: 49
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Giving visibility to urban change in Rio de Janeiro through digital audio-visual culture: A Brazilian webdocumentary project and its circulation
Authors: Tori Holmes
Page Start: 63
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Haptic film spaces and the rhythms of everyday life in São Paulo in Lina Chamie’s A via láctea
Authors: Andrew C. Rajca
Page Start: 87
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Noise, soundscape and heritage: Sound cartographies and urban segregation in twenty-first-century Mexico City
Authors: Natalia Bieletto-Bueno
Page Start: 107
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Contested urban heritage: Discourses of meaning and ownership of the Mosque-Cathedral of Córdoba, Spain
Authors: Brian Rosa And Jaime Jover-Báez
Page Start: 127
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Urban fortunes: Spatializing the community of money in Alex de la Iglesia’s La comunidad
Authors: Malcolm A. Compitello
Page Start: 155
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The irresistible outside: Innocence, desire and transgression in a Brazilian urban utopia
Authors: Matthew A. Richmond
Page Start: 177
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Edward Soja’s postmetropolis: A contemporary urban phenomenon as seen in Latin American cinema
Authors: Andrea Franco
Page Start: 187
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Digital Barcelona: An interdisciplinary urban cultural studies digital project
Authors: Benjamin Fraser And Camille Kresz And Irina Swain
Page Start: 195
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SPECIAL SECTION: IMAGINING GROUND ZERO
Edited by Huma Mohibullah and Martin Lund
Introduction: Imagining Ground Zero
Authors: Huma Mohibullah And Martin Lund
Page Start: 207
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No safe spaces: Notes on the National September 11 Museum
Authors: Laura Frost
Page Start: 221
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‘Every day is 9/11!’: Re-constructing Ground Zero in three US comics
Authors: Martin Lund
Page Start: 241
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Sacred space: Muslim and Arab belonging at Ground Zero
Authors: Huma Mohibullah
Page Start: 263
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Frozen thought: Physical representations of power and the rebuilding of Ground Zero
Authors: Katherine C. Donahue
Page Start: 283
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Call for Papers: WOUNDED GALAXIES / 1968: Beneath the Paving Stones, the Beach

WOUNDED GALAXIES / 1968: Beneath the Paving Stones, the Beach

Festival + Symposium 

Feb 8-10, 2018

Indiana University

Call for Papers

The Sixties were a turbulent period, characterized by major revolutions in scholarship, politics, culture and the arts.  Indiana University, in conjunction with The Burroughs Century, plans an academic symposium welcoming scholars, archivists, filmmakers, and others interested in exploring the intellectual and aesthetic legacy of 1968, during its 50th anniversary year.  The conference will be held on the beautiful Bloomington, Indiana campus and will be hosted by Indiana University’s Media School; the Indiana University Libraries (including the Lilly Library and the IU Libraries Moving Image Archive); and Indiana University Cinema, which has earned an international reputation for the high quality of its facilities and programming.

Accompanying the symposium will be a series of films and an exhibition featuring rare and unique items from the IU Library collection. Renowned scholars such as Greil Marcus McKenzie Wark, and, possibly, Penelope Rosemont are expected to give talks, introduce films, and appear in Q&A sessions following screenings.

In addition, we are planning an art exhibit, as well as series of experimental music performances and spoken word presentations, in keeping with the larger theme of radical aesthetics.  We plan to publish the conference proceedings.

Interested participants are invited to submit paper proposals on any aspect of the international history and cultural legacy of 1968.  Papers need not be limited to any particular critical, theoretical, historical, or political subject or method. We hope to receive proposals that deal with previously unexplored issues, but we are also interested in proposals that offer fresh approaches to much-discussed work.  As the symposium title suggests, we are using the Situationists as a point of departure and particularly welcome presentations that consider the revolutionary potential of the Everyday—in both historical and contemporary situations.

But we are happy to consider any proposals that address the historical legacy of 1968, and welcome submissions that attempt to trace the legacy of 68 in contemporary art and culture.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

history and historiography of 1968; the post-1968 generation and terrorism; post ’68 science fiction; anthropology and the Situationists; architecture after ’68; counter/sub-cultures after ’68; literature and literary theory; The Annales school and radical shifts in historiography; Marshall McLuhan and the electronic revolution; The history and legacy of the Black Panther Party; Chicago 1968; The International Student Movement(s); Revolution and the University;Prague Spring – experimental & avant-garde art, film, literature & music made during this period of freedom; the avant-garde going underground during Normalization; lingering impacts of Prague Spring on experimental & avant-garde art/music/lit/etc.; Surrealisms outside France – the internationalization of surrealism that happened in the late-60s onward (U.S., African surrealisms, Poland’s “Orange Alternative”, etc.); Neo-Dada and Fluxus; French New Wave cinema and its response to the events of Mai; Third Cinema(s); East vs. West perspectives: pro-socialist avant-gardes in the West Europe versus anti-socialist avant-gardes in East Europe

Proposals should be limited to 300 words in length and consist of a brief description of the paper’s theme or focus, plus a one-page vita. Proposals may be submitted for individual papers or for sessions featuring two or three panelists. Proposals for panels should be submitted as a group by the organizer, along with a short explanation of the unifying theme. In addition, each panel proposal should consist of individual paper descriptions (limited to 300 words in length), names of panelists and their vitae.

Please email your proposals to Joan Hawkins jchawkin@indiana.edu, by July 1, 2017. The Symposium Program Committee will evaluate all submissions and notify all candidates of the results by Aug 1, 2017. We look forward to your proposals, and to celebrating/reevaluating the legacy of international political and aesthetic upheaval.