Hispanic Urban Studies book series launched [Palgrave Macmillan]

Hispanic Urban Studies

[Click here for *.pdf announcement: Hispanic Urban Studies]


 

Edited by

Benjamin Fraser, East Carolina University, USA

Susan Larson, University of Kentucky, USA


 

Hispanic Urban Studies is a series of scholarly monographs, edited volumes, and translations focusing on Spanish, Latin American and US Latino urban culture.

The humanities and the social sciences are closer in methodology than ever before. Hispanic Urban Studies serves a dual purpose: to introduce radically original humanities work to social science researchers while affirming the relevance of cultural production to discussions of the urban. This book series takes advantage of and further contributes to exciting interdisciplinary discussions between Hispanic Studies and Cultural Geography with the aim of bringing in new ideas about space, place, and culture from all parts of the Hispanic world. Monograph titles bring together analyses of the cultural production of the Hispanic world with urban and spatial theory from a range of disciplinary contexts. The series also welcomes proposals for edited volumes related to cities that contribute in creative ways to our understanding of the spatial turn in Hispanic Studies. Translations published in the series introduce English-language readers to the rich legacy of materials on urbanism, urban culture, and cultural geography originally published in Spanish.


 

Advisory Board

Malcolm Compitello, University of Arizona, USA; Monica Degen, Brunel University, London, UK; Cecilia Enjuto Rangel, University of Oregon, USA; Amanda Holmes, McGill University, Canada; Marcy Schwartz, Rutgers University, USA; Álvaro Sevilla Buitrago, Polytechnic University of Madrid, Spain; Armando Silva, National University of Colombia, Bogotá; Michael Ugarte, University of Missouri, Columbia, USA; Víctor Valle, California Polytechnic State University, USA.


 

If you would like to submit a proposal for the Hispanic Urban Studies Series please feel free to contact:

Farideh Koohi-Kamali

Palgrave Macmillan

Farideh.Koohi@palgrave-usa.com

 

Urban Collages in São Paulo in Curious Quarterly, the Royal BC Museum online journal

Leonardo Cardoso

ImageJack Lohman, CEO of the Royal BC Museum in Victoria (Canada), used one of my sound collages in his online article on Museums and Memory. The article references the language museum in Sao Paulo and the role of intangible heritage – including the sounds of people and the city.

Click here to read/hear Lohman’s article.

Curious Quarterly Web Site

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Documentary on Grandview-Woodland Planning Process

the city

Simon Fraser University student John Nguyen recently produced this timely documentary – Grand View – on the east Vancouver Grandview-Woodland neighbourhood planning process. The film provides a variety of perspectives on the process and opposition. The City‘s host and producer Andy Longhurst is featured in the documentary. You can find The City‘s special radio documentary on the topic here.

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Book Review: Michael Sorkin’s “All Over the Map”

Redrawing the New York-Comics Relationship

Architectural critic Michael Sorkin‘s All Over the Map: Writing on Buildings and Cities is a collection of writings from the period 2000-2010. Most of the pieces have appeared in print elsewhere earlier, particularly in the Architectural Record. But for those of us who do not subscribe to that publication, this Verso edition is not far short of a godsend. The book is at times rip-roaringly funny, at other times abysmally saddening, often acerbically pointed (not fully Menckenesque, but it definitely packs a punch), and, in general, lucidly critical.

While the book is never boring (ok, perhaps on an extremely rare occasion or two, when Sorkin ventures into purely inter-architectural territory), perhaps the most interesting thread is the one dealing with the events of September 11, 2001. All Over the Map reprints columns and articles that give excellent and accessible record of the immediate aftermath of the attack on…

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new MLA Forums – incl. Geography and Literature

If you are an MLA member, think about supporting the creation of the new Forum on Geography and Literature (this is a competitive process — you can vote for five new forums, the top ones will be created for 2016, you only have until June 15 to vote).

Just click here to go to the MLA Commons site, you will have to ‘join’. Then click on ‘petition thread’ which brings you here, where you merely enter your name as I have done.

Think too about petitioning for the Global Hispanophone group, which is here.

Madrid’s Gran Vía Digital Humanities Project

Brief video introduction [created with Camtasia 2] explaining a student-produced Digital Humanities project investigating Madrid’s Gran Vía [created with Omeka / Neatline].

This way of approaching DH work is particularly conducive to urban-scaled projects, and does not require extensive data mining or GIS components – although these approaches could certainly be integrated. (I will be presenting this project alongside my colleague at a June conference in Charleston titled: Data Driven: Digital Humanities in the Library.)

Explore the map-interface of the actual DH project here.

Notes on Architecture and Cultural Production

Architecture of Analogy

Montage of Rossi (1976) La città analoga; and Serlio (1545) Scena Tragica. On the left, Rossi places a standing figure into the city making clear that the city is the result of human labour, both manual and mental. On the right, Serlio emphasises the street as a public space defined by a wall of buildings. Montage of Rossi (1976) La città analoga; and Serlio (1545) Scena Tragica.
On the left, Rossi places a standing figure into the city making clear that the city is the result of human labour, both manual and mental. On the right, Serlio emphasises the street as a public space defined by a wall of buildings.

While it is clear that architecture is not autonomous from culture, it is possible to understand architecture as autonomous in relation to culture because architecture is a discipline with its own rules, values, formal and conceptual principles which are put forward in theories, drawings, built and unbuilt examples. Yet architecture gives concrete form to culture and came into being with the first traces of the city. Architecture is rooted in the formation of culture and civilisation so that the history of architecture, which is the city, is also the history of culture. Architecture, culture and…

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