Peter Marcuse Poem — “When it comes to the Right to the City..”

A friend just sent me this poem by Peter Marcuse, included with the Afterword of the 2012 Routledge book Cities for People, Not for Profit: from what I can see, the book itself seems to be linked with a special issue of the journal City from 2009 available here and was commented on pre-publication at Progressive Geographies here.
“Light verse”

When it comes to the Right to the City,
Don’t get mired just in some nitty-gritty,
Maybe break for a ditty,
Even if it isn’t so witty,
Making it boring would be a real pity.

You need to understand class,
If you don’t want to fall on your ass;
It isn’t so easy,
But if you get queasy,
And fudge it, you’ll lose it, alas.

If to critical theory you’ve aspired,
But in abstractions have gotten yourself mired,
Link your theory with action,
Help theory get traction,
You’ll get clearer, be useful — and tired.

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Technology of Citizenship/Citizenship as Technology

A corporation known as Pegasus Global Holdings is building a city — named CITE — in the desert outside of Hobbs, NM for the purpose of allowing companies to run prototypes of their new technology. CITE will have no citizens, only scientists and developers who hope to test products in an empty space. As Emily Badger reports (you can read the article here), New Mexico is hoping for big gains by means of urban boosterism of their undeveloped land. Of course, technology companies capitalize by selling this citizen free city for big returns and, ostensibly, to make “dumb cities” smarter. Bob Brumley, a senior managing director of Pegasus, sells the space as one that he hopes will answer this question: “How do we effectively spend billions of public dollars needed to make our cities smarter, more efficient, and sustainable, if we don’t know for certain exactly which technologies will do the job?” (Badger, FastCompany 5-23-12). The questions remains: what will human citizens in the “legacy cities” that CITI is modeled on gain from the project? It would be helpful to know which problems companies already investing in CITI– google is one example — are hoping to solve for people in the lived spaces they inhabit, especially when the testing is done in an uninhabited space. Even though this project does seems to suggest a potentially positive partnership between private industry and public funds, without knowing the issues the companies hope to address — social justice or more efficient consumption — , it’s hard to not see this as part of the plot line of a post-apocalyptic sci-fi novel. In fact, it is the plot line of a post-apocalyptic sci-fi short story by Miguel de Unamuno, Mecanópolis (1913).

Association Concert Urbain

See on Scoop.itURBANmedias

David Harvey, theorist and author of Rebel Cities: From the Right to the City to the Urban Revolution, says that postwar capitalism can be understood with reference to the history of urbanisation and suburbanisation. Urban investment gets you out of a crisis but defines what the next crisis is going to look like, he argues. The emerging powers of the east are now in the midst of a massive urbanisation project and could fall victim to the same outcome

See on www.guardian.co.uk

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threecitiesproject

I’ve just uploaded one of the pieces that I wrote as part of the Three Cities Project to a new website.  I’m looking for volunteers to download it to their mp3 players and then go for a walk somewhere (anywhere) with it playing through headphones.  The original recording was made in the Hermitage Museum in Saint Petersburg earlier this year.  You may want to visit a local gallery or museum…or you might just take a walk down a nearby street – it really doesn’t matter.

What I’d then like is a short email with the following:
Where you walked
When (including time of day)
A few words about the experience – any observations?
If you happen to take any photographs along the way, that would be hugely appreciated – but not essential.

 

Emails shoud be sent to rossco242@yahoo.co.uk

 

With your permission I’d then put a short post on the…

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CFP–Lisbon: Art and Heritage (Journal of Art History)

Call for papers reposted from h-net online, see the original post here.

H-Net Announcement Journal of Art History – Lisbon: Art and Heritage

Call for Papers Date: 2012-07-31
Date Submitted: 2012-05-25
Announcement ID: 194771
Those interested in contributing to this issue of the Journal of Art History are invited to submit original papers. Discussion should focus on issues and problems such as:
1) New contributions to the History of the City: Architecture, Urban Planning and Heritage.
2) Lisbon Art History: Artists, models and case studies.
3) The image and images of Lisbon: evolution of the city’s iconography– from illuminated manuscripts to cinema.
4) Towards a history of Lisbon – reflections on Lisbon studies. Proposals for papers should be maximum 500 words long and include a header with the author’s details (name, affiliation and e-mail). Abstracts should be accompanied by a brief curriculum vitae of the author (150 words maximum). Documents can be submitted in Portuguese, Spanish, French or English. Proposal should be sent by e-mail to estudosdelisboa@gmail.com by July 31st, 2012.
Selected proposal are to be developed into final papers (5000 words maximum) which will observe the journal’s editorial guidelines available for consultation at http://iha.fcsh.unl.pt/apresentacao.php?id=41. Final articles must be delivered by November 30th, 2012, and will be submitted to a standard process of double blind review.
IHA|Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas|UNL
Av. de Berna, nº 26 – C
1069-061 Lisboa
Email: estudosdelisboa@gmail.com

The Brooklyn Bakery Blog

Combining various perspectives and bold, bright colors, Lee Baker created his installation entitled “Refractive Monolith”, displaying the tense relationship between urbanization and culture. Ten thousand metres of yarn allude to the weak infrastructure of buildings. The intense hues aim to communicate security and happiness but the grey backdrop represents the ominous darkness that may lie ahead. Stunning photos are below and make sure to watch a timelapse of the building process at the end.

Photos via Baker’s website and here.

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