Call for Book Chapters: ‘Temporality and Digital Mapping’

Originally posted on The Semaphore Line:

Banner Plain

Editors: Sybille Lammes, Chris Perkins, Nanna Verhoeff, Sam Hind, Alex Gekker, Clancy Wilmott.

Call for Chapters

Digital mapping, though generally conceived as a spatial activity, is as strongly grounded in time. With the digital era disintegrating representational fixity, scholars, adept at grappling with the spatial implications of digitality, continue to struggle to conceptualize and communicate the temporal consequences of maps that shift with each moment.

In this peer-reviewed collection we seek to take up Doreen Massey’s (2005: 107) still critical concern: how do we cope with the ‘ongoing stories’ in the world. Mapping has long wrestled with the difficulty of enrolling time into such narratives. This collection aims to examine how this is impacted by the presence of digital mapping technologies that, arguably, have disrupted our understanding of time as much as they have provided coherence.

We are looking for contributions that move beyond the descriptive to pay particular attention…

View original 279 more words

Engaging Undergraduates with Digital Scholarship Projects

Originally posted on Rebecca Frost Davis:

Today, I’m presenting at Temple University Center for Humanities as part of their Digital Humanities in Practice series.  More information is here:  http://www.cla.temple.edu/chat/activities/index.html#davis  This post includes links, references, and slides for my talk.Center for the Humanities, Temple University

View original 355 more words

Lisbon. Gallery Urban Art. Oct 24th.

Originally posted on Steps towards an urban speech:

Annual Exhibition of Urban Art – 2014 edition

The Exhibition of Urban Art 2014 opens this Friday, October 24 at 18:00, the panels of the Calçada da Gloria and Largo da Oliveirinha, ending the cycle of the exhibition Urban Art Gallery this year, with interventions designed by GODMESS , HagaieL, Isaiah Silva, KLIT, MURTA and UIVO, Sofia Pidwell and Tamara Alves.
Selected by a jury composed of representatives of this edition CMLisboa, FUEL TV and the WOOL Festival, the new parts of this heterogeneous group of authors, illustrate the multiplicity of artistic forms practiced in the world of urban art, the distinctive experience of participants – those who have have years of work on the street and those who want to start painting on this scale – as well as the diversity of its provenance: from graffiti, to illustration, design, painting, or by passing through…

View original 598 more words

Ecumenopolis: city without limits

Originally posted on archithoughts:

I have to share this great article written by Juan Manuel Restepo on Favela Issues.

In today’s cities we see how governments struggle to create solutions and to implement large policies. Cities are more complex, diverse and dynamic making governance almost impossible. Governments can’t make changes in these cities by themselves. They need to build collective efforts with all the stakeholders in the city.

IMG_3491

Nevertheless, politicians keep on promising and acting as if they had the capacity to make real changes by themselves. They keep on bringing THE SOLUTION for mobility, security, education and health without really understanding the issues or the actors behind them that control real power in the city. During the political campaigns they promise everything and give figures of all the great changes they want to make. But when they get elected the passionate candidates crush with a wall of the real power that controls the city through…

View original 845 more words

Henri Lefebvre, Vers une architecture de la jouissance

Originally posted on Progressive Geographies:

criticat14cover210690034_387393451417965_7363263115971561396_nWhile there is a published translation into English, Henri Lefebvre’s 1973 manuscript Vers une architecture de la jouissance has, until now, not been available in French. Now an excerpt has been published in Criticat, and a full edition may be forthcoming. This issue of the journal also includes an analysis by Łukasz Stanek, editor of the English edition.

View original

Urban abstracts

Originally posted on hovercraftdoggy:

Matthias Heiderich, Reflexionen (2)Matthias Heiderich, Reflexionen (3)Matthias Heiderich, Reflexionen (4)Matthias Heiderich, Reflexionen (5)Matthias Heiderich, Reflexionen (6)Matthias Heiderich, Reflexionen (1)

From the series ‘Reflexionen Eins’ by Matthias Heiderich. Matthias is a self taught photographer who lives in Berlin, Germany and loves architecture. He is a 32-year-old landscape photographer, heavily influenced by architecture, graphic design, colour and the urban landscape, seems primarily concerned about the composition and the colors. The symmetry and truth that comes out of every building as a living organism. Combining colorful and vibrant images he creates somehow unreal and yet timeless landscapes that represent Berlin in wonderful facets

View original

The Human Scale

Originally posted on Relational Cartographies:

“Based on the work of famed architect and urban planner Jan Gehl and his visionary work transforming urban environments from traffic-congested streets and cold urban landscapes into havens for people and real human interaction. Gehl has been leading a revolution in urban planning that has been transforming cities worldwide. From the expanded pedestrian spaces in New York’s Times Square, to Copenhagen’s famed bike lanes, to the rebuilding of earthquake devastated Christchurch New Zealand, Gehl’s team bring real solutions that promise a more humanistic dimension to cities where people are not displaced by congested streets, skyscrapers, and the car-centric urbanism of the 1960s and ’70s.”

Free Low-Resolution Full Feature with Spanish Subtitles

Full Feature Available (SD/HD) for Rent

View original