Richard J Williams:

Not an academic post, exactly, so forgive me. But it is about the peculiarities of living in an unusually settled city with its own (very) peculiar rules. The game described here is real enough, although CORSON is unaware it’s being played. More seriously, it draws attention to the strangely dilapidated character of one of Edinburgh’s wealthiest areas. Sharon Zukin, when I took her around recently found it very hard to understand. It all looked ‘poor’, she thought. I have to agree, though there’s plenty of money squirrelled away.

Originally posted on citythreepointzero:

“CORSON”: THE RULES

“CORSON” is a game for two players. Players must take the role of either the CUSTOMER or CORSON. The game is played in an old-fashioned hardware shop in Stockbridge, on the North side of Edinburgh. The play has competing objectives. If the player is the CUSTOMER, the objective is simply to buy any item from the shop. If the player takes the role of CORSON, the objective is to prevent the CUSTOMER from making a purchase. Detailed rules follow:

1. The CUSTOMER enters shop and requests an item of hardware normally found in such a shop. Nails, screws, bolts and tools are all typical requests. Toasters, vacuum cleaners and other domestic goods are also acceptable requests. For a request successfully fulfilled by CORSON, the CUSTOMER scores 1 point.

2. CORSON cannot refuse a request for an item he has in stock at the time of play. He…

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About Richard J Williams

Professor of contemporary visual cultures. Likes cities, movies, rock'n'roll, Brazil, the US. Grumpy exiled mancunian. Writes about cities, takes pictures, and does many things at University of Edinburgh, UK. Books on cities include 'The Anxious City' (Routledge, 2004), 'Brazil' (Reaktion 2009), 'Regenerating Culture and Society' (edited with Jonathan Harris, LUP 2010), and 'Sex and Buildings' (Reaktion, all being well, 2012). In preparation is Order and Disorder in Urban Space and Form, with Paul Jenkins (Routledge 2013). Used to know about art, but now prefers to make his own. See exhibition of photographs, 'Richard Williams: United States', Stills Gallery, Edinburgh, until March 18, 2012.

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