Originally posted on citythreepointzero:

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There’s a hint of opportunism about this volume, a collection of essays on capitalism and the city dating from 2008. It gives Occupy something to feed on, and arrives nicely for the one-year anniversary of Britain’s riots, and the Olympic Games. No matter: we need people like Harvey to articulate an alternative to the capitalist city and its tendency to turn it into a relentless parade. There is much to like here: a critical introduction to the relationship between ‘fictional’ capital and real estate development; some commentary on the Left’s anxieties about social organisation, especially the problem of ‘horizontality’ (p. 70); a fascinating encounter with the ‘rebel city’ of El Alto, near La Paz. Much alludes to Harvey’s gloomy but compelling work on Baltimore, in which that small American city comes to represent the destructive power of capital, and the emptiness of its attempts at economic revival. ‘Revitalisation’ so often…

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This entry was posted in David Harvey, new books, Review Item, Uncategorized and tagged , , by Richard J Williams. Bookmark the permalink.

About Richard J Williams

Professor of contemporary visual cultures. Likes cities, movies, rock'n'roll, Brazil, the US. Grumpy exiled mancunian. Writes about cities, takes pictures, and does many things at University of Edinburgh, UK. Books on cities include 'The Anxious City' (Routledge, 2004), 'Brazil' (Reaktion 2009), 'Regenerating Culture and Society' (edited with Jonathan Harris, LUP 2010), and 'Sex and Buildings' (Reaktion, all being well, 2012). In preparation is Order and Disorder in Urban Space and Form, with Paul Jenkins (Routledge 2013). Used to know about art, but now prefers to make his own. See exhibition of photographs, 'Richard Williams: United States', Stills Gallery, Edinburgh, until March 18, 2012.

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